AI: law passed in European Parliament paves the way for a future where artificial intelligence will be a more beneficial force

The rapid development of the uses of artificial intelligence, especially genetic artificial intelligence, creates enormous opportunities but also significant risks.

Contributed by Peter Sandkuijl is VP of Sales Engineering EMEA at Check Point Software

The new European law on artificial intelligence, widely accepted this Wednesday by MEPs, aims to introduce controls and ratings on its use. This is “the world's first binding law on artificial intelligence” according to the text's co-sponsor.

The speed of AI adoption shows that legislation alone cannot keep up and that the technology is so powerful that it can and could seriously impact industries, economies and governments. I hope that the EU AI law will serve as a catalyst for wider societal debates, inspiring stakeholders to think not only about what the technology can achieve, but also about the results it can have.

By establishing clear guidelines and fostering ongoing dialogue, it paves the way for a future where AI is a more beneficial force, grounded in ethical reasoning and social consensus.

Automatically recognizing faces in a room and analyzing emotions and facial expressions is a major technological advance in itself, but it's also a worrying one. This is not about stifling innovation, but about creating a legal framework that aligns with democratic values ​​while protecting the rights of European Union citizens.

This is the first global law to address the risks associated with the uses of artificial intelligence and which aims to mitigate the risk that its uses violate human rights or perpetuate prejudice. Whether it's the arbitrary scanning of gender-biased CVs in recruitment campaigns, the ubiquitous surveillance of public space by AI-powered cameras or the invasive analysis of medical data, this European AI law aims to set clear limits on the development of AI , so providers and developers have certain guidelines and safeguards. That way, the “good guys” will be able to see the dividing line and provide the access and tools necessary to hunt down those who cross that dividing line.

Transparency is a central principle for EU actors, especially when it comes to genetic artificial intelligence. By enforcing transparency in the AI ​​training process, this legislation aims to highlight potential biases and mistakes made by AI before they are accepted as truth. Let's remember that artificial intelligence is not always right. On the contrary, it makes more mistakes than any current technology, and therefore transparency becomes an essential tool for mitigating its flaws.

Initial attention will be paid to the heavy fines imposed, but that is not the main focus. As laws are accepted, they will be further tested and judged by the courts, setting precedents for future offenders. We have to understand that it will take time to come to fruition, which may actually be more useful, even if it is not the end goal.

The speed of AI adoption shows that legislation alone cannot keep up and that the technology is so powerful that it can and could seriously impact industries, economies and governments. I hope that the EU AI law will serve as a catalyst for wider societal debates, inspiring stakeholders to think not only about what the technology can achieve, but also about the results it can have.

By establishing clear guidelines and fostering ongoing dialogue, AI paves the way for a future where it will be a more beneficial force, grounded in ethical considerations and social consensus.


Read also: Creative artificial intelligence

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